THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

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Perspectives Art

fuck your mosh pit: schoolboy q and isaiah rashad on tour

by WILL TOASPERN

The Oxymoron tour, featuring ScHoolboy Q, Isaiah Rashad, Vince Staples and Audio Push, came to the Regency Ballroom in San Francisco last week for two back-to-back shows. I saw him on Monday at the Catalyst Theater in Santa Cruz before his tour manager decided it made sense for him to go way the fuck out to Reno before coming back to the Bay tonight. As a side note, I haven’t trusted whomever they have doing Q and Ab-Soul’s tour scheduling ever since the pair missed their set time at Sasquatch Music Festival (a crowd in which I dutifully stood with my not-very-cool bucket hat) because they were under the impression that the festival was just outside of Seattle. Regardless, this review sheds light on my experience at this ongoing tour.

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shaping chaos: a review of “Redeployment” by Phil Klay

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by GILLIE COLLINS

Good writing gives shape to chaos. Stories have the power to make paradox survivable, useful, beautiful. There is a particular urgency, then, to literature about war.

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taming the beast: a review of Les Miserables

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by KATIE STRAUB

Les Misérables is the show every now-college-aged musical theater geek saw when they were ten years old, memorized, and has since been singing in the shower. When Ram’s Head asked the Stanford student body if “they hear the people sing” and opened auditions early last quarter, every closeted showgirl and -guy at Stanford felt at least some pull to come out of the woodwork (or that steaming shower stall) for a chance to sing legendary music and play legendary roles.

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special fees emails finally end: YOUR WEEK THREE PLAYLIST

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by StAR STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS

The tides are changing. We have a new duo at the helm of our favorite student government.

When you’re done deleting all those emails regarding SAFE reform, have a listen.

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opera without apology: Deborah Voigt at Bing

by TOBIN ASHER

Quality and appreciation. Through simple logic, one would expect that the better something is, the more it is valued. But reason alone cannot explain the empty seats at Friday night’s concert.

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an open love letter to Annie Clark

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by SOPHIA LAURENZI

Everyone has a crush on Annie.

Anxiously anticipating the encore of her March 22 concert, the audience rattled the floors of Fox Theater in Oakland with chants of “Annie! Annie! Annie!” A newcomer to her music would never guess that the snowy-haired, electric-guitar-playing space princess known as St. Vincent was the stage name of the reserved, down-to-earth Annie Clark, but this was an audience that called her name like she was a familiar friend.

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“Blood will have blood”: A review of Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More

by NOEMI BERKOWITZ

It was pitch dark and I was holding a playing card, wandering through a black maze to a bar to get into “the experience.” That’s how Sleep No More began, an immersive site-specific theater piece open now in New York City, based on Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca.  I had “checked in” to the McKittrick hotel, a couple of warehouses that had been converted into five floors of rooms the audience was free to wander.

After getting through the dimly lit maze, I arrived at a bar and waited for my playing card number to be called. After a few minutes in the bar, you will be called “darling” by at least one of the gothic bartenders and offered a drink before you go in  - according to them, “you’ll need it.”

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driving a bus through the fourth wall: an interview with sammi cannold

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by BOJAN SRB

It is extremely easy to slip into the mindset of considering Sammi Cannold (’16) a rising star. We might be lulled into thinking this, but she certainly isn’t. Modest, focused, and driven, she proclaims to approach theatre holistically, never centering a show around any given subset of its team (ahem, actors). Even this hour-long conversation revealed that there is a rabidly creative mind working incessantly beneath her calm comportment –an exquisitely self-reflective directorial psyche responsible for some of Stanford’s most memorable musicals. This includes fall quarter’s most talked about show, Violet, which Cannold staged on a moving bus. At the very least, it is safe to say she is one of the loudest voices in a choir of students claiming that theatre is not dead, and that its stories continue to matter.

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soundtrack to the sun: YOUR WEEK TWO PLAYLIST

Stanford Spring Quarter exists in a bizarre dilemma universe where every day feels like a beautiful afternoon in mid-July where nothing matters except having a cold drink and a pair of sunglasses.. while still still living up to the academic requirements of one of the most demanding universities in the country.

WOOP WOOP.  Here’s your soundtrack to the sun:

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a post-modern romantic: an interview with Alex Ketley, Director of ‘Swan Lake: Recalibrated’

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by ANJANA BALA

When I watched Swan Lake: Recalibrated in late February, I was immediately struck by the exploration of the blurred lines between movement and language. “Bodies” didn’t even come to mind as they normally do when I watch dancers move; it seemed as if human ties dissolved entirely into a unique kind of motion. The darkness of Swan Lake was clearly palatable, but this time fragmented through an abstract, modern lens.

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