THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

Features Opinions
Perspectives Art

death of a star: the life of Gabriel García Márquez

by TULIO OSPINA

Like the stars in the sky, bright things can be created by heat and dust. At the beginning of the 20th century, such a star was born in the sweltering and arid pueblo of Aracataca, Colombia. This man was Gabriel García Márquez, one of Latin America’s greatest literary figures and a well-loved writer throughout the world. He passed away on Thursday in Mexico City. He was 87 years old.

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the day after, um, easter: YOUR WEEK FOUR PLAYLIST

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by StAR STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS

We gave up procrastination for Lent. Now that that’s over, we’d like to wish you a happy Easter and we’ll finish writi…

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our national treasure: in defense of nicolas cage

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by KELSEY DAYTON

Nicolas Cage’s new movie came out last week. 

Normally that’s enough. I’ll get very excited, drag some reluctant and tolerant friend to the closest movie theater, and appreciate as fully as possible the incomparable experience of seeing those magnificent, crazed eyes bug out on the big screen. 

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fuck your mosh pit: schoolboy q and isaiah rashad on tour

by WILL TOASPERN

The Oxymoron tour, featuring ScHoolboy Q, Isaiah Rashad, Vince Staples and Audio Push, came to the Regency Ballroom in San Francisco last week for two back-to-back shows. I saw him on Monday at the Catalyst Theater in Santa Cruz before his tour manager decided it made sense for him to go way the fuck out to Reno before coming back to the Bay tonight. As a side note, I haven’t trusted whomever they have doing Q and Ab-Soul’s tour scheduling ever since the pair missed their set time at Sasquatch Music Festival (a crowd in which I dutifully stood with my not-very-cool bucket hat) because they were under the impression that the festival was just outside of Seattle. Regardless, this review sheds light on my experience at this ongoing tour.

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shaping chaos: a review of “Redeployment” by Phil Klay

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by GILLIE COLLINS

Good writing gives shape to chaos. Stories have the power to make paradox survivable, useful, beautiful. There is a particular urgency, then, to literature about war.

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taming the beast: a review of Les Miserables

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by KATIE STRAUB

Les Misérables is the show every now-college-aged musical theater geek saw when they were ten years old, memorized, and has since been singing in the shower. When Ram’s Head asked the Stanford student body if “they hear the people sing” and opened auditions early last quarter, every closeted showgirl and -guy at Stanford felt at least some pull to come out of the woodwork (or that steaming shower stall) for a chance to sing legendary music and play legendary roles.

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special fees emails finally end: YOUR WEEK THREE PLAYLIST

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by StAR STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS

The tides are changing. We have a new duo at the helm of our favorite student government.

When you’re done deleting all those emails regarding SAFE reform, have a listen.

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opera without apology: Deborah Voigt at Bing

by TOBIN ASHER

Quality and appreciation. Through simple logic, one would expect that the better something is, the more it is valued. But reason alone cannot explain the empty seats at Friday night’s concert.

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an open love letter to Annie Clark

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by SOPHIA LAURENZI

Everyone has a crush on Annie.

Anxiously anticipating the encore of her March 22 concert, the audience rattled the floors of Fox Theater in Oakland with chants of “Annie! Annie! Annie!” A newcomer to her music would never guess that the snowy-haired, electric-guitar-playing space princess known as St. Vincent was the stage name of the reserved, down-to-earth Annie Clark, but this was an audience that called her name like she was a familiar friend.

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“Blood will have blood”: A review of Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More

by NOEMI BERKOWITZ

It was pitch dark and I was holding a playing card, wandering through a black maze to a bar to get into “the experience.” That’s how Sleep No More began, an immersive site-specific theater piece open now in New York City, based on Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca.  I had “checked in” to the McKittrick hotel, a couple of warehouses that had been converted into five floors of rooms the audience was free to wander.

After getting through the dimly lit maze, I arrived at a bar and waited for my playing card number to be called. After a few minutes in the bar, you will be called “darling” by at least one of the gothic bartenders and offered a drink before you go in  - according to them, “you’ll need it.”

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