THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

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#emmyforMaslany, or: the 2014 Emmy Nominations

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by MATTHEW LIBBY

The nominees are in for this year’s Emmy Awards, and they are the usual cocktail of brilliantly inspired, boringly obvious, and mind numbingly confounding. While the nominees get their tuxes pressed and select the episode they will submit to the voting body for consideration, here are my opinionated rants and wild speculations as to the potential victors of TV’s most anticipated awards.

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he’s back: excitement for Bill Murray’s “St. Vincent”

by KELSEY DAYTON

Lost in the manic excitement over LeBron James’s return to Cleveland, which continues to ripple through the sports world fulfilling fan fantasies of Biblical proportions, is another lost son’s return to his promised land, a return that is equally critical to American Pop Culture.

That son would be Bill Murray, and that promised land is broad comedy.

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war of the worlds: a review of Neighbors

by MATTHEW LIBBY

Plastered all over the promotion for Nicholas Stoller’s latest film Neighbors is the endorsement: “From the guys who brought you This is the End.” While there are obvious economic and creative reasons for this marketing tactic, it could be misleading. This is the End, while one of the funniest films I’ve seen in a long time, was all about mayhem on a literally apocalyptic scale. Neighbors, while too being one of the funnier films in recent years, deals with a very different kind of mayhem. The conflicts are small-scale and deeply personal, and the movie is an exercise in finding impossibly hysterical ways to keep upping the ante.

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i’d like to have you over for dinner: a review of “Under the Skin”

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by TULIO OSPINA

In the movies, aliens walk among us – and they are often disguised as dangerously seductive women. (I can name ten movies off the top of my head where this trope exists and “E.T.” is not one of them.) In this alone is Jonathan Glazer’s newest film, “Under the Skin,” unoriginal. Everything else about the film will most likely make it the most polarizing creep-show of the year.

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our national treasure: in defense of nicolas cage

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by KELSEY DAYTON

Nicolas Cage’s new movie came out last week. 

Normally that’s enough. I’ll get very excited, drag some reluctant and tolerant friend to the closest movie theater, and appreciate as fully as possible the incomparable experience of seeing those magnificent, crazed eyes bug out on the big screen. 

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THE LEGO MOVIE, or: EVERYTHING IS AWESOME!

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by MATTHEW LIBBY

You owe it to your inner 10-year-old to see this movie. You know who I’m talking about: that kid who would come back from school and, no matter how tired they were, pull out their Legos or Barbies or whatever those crazy kids played with. They would pull out these plastic toys, these building blocks of creativity, and make a world with their mind. And it was magical.

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throwback thursday: the ghost of valentine’s past

by MATTHEW LIBBY, HANNA TYSON, and ALEC ARCENEAUX

Oh man. Oh geez. It’s Valentine’s Eve. Either you forgot to get a significant other or you forgot to get something for your significant other. Plus midterms, and that bomb scare. It’s been a rough week. Uncork some wine, buy some overpriced chocolates, and listen/watch/read what a bunch of old dudes have said about love and other Hallmark’s card bullshit.

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Choke Me With That Dead Cat, or: 2013, A Year in Movies

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by MATTHEW LIBBY

According to my log, I saw 106 movies from 2013 last year. I don’t know how that happened. I really don’t. That’s about 25 more than I saw any year since I started logging all of my viewings.

Do I regret seeing any of these movies? Yes. Some, very much so. 
Will I remember most of them by this time next year? Hell no.
Do I have a social life? I think so, but I’m not so sure anymore!

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Rushed and Ridiculous: A Review of Ender’s Game

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by MARC ROBBINS

If only Ender’s Game could have instead been adapted into a trilogy. There is too much morally and psychologically charged material in the original book to be transported into only one film. 

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LONE SURVIVOR, or: a bright, sunny day in Hell.

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by MATTHEW LIBBY

The opening credits of director Peter Berg’s latest film Lone Survivor are an eccentrically-edited extended montage of still images and video, all building towards a crucial point: Navy boot-camp is Hell.

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