THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

Features Opinions
Perspectives Art

driving a bus through the fourth wall: an interview with sammi cannold

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by BOJAN SRB

It is extremely easy to slip into the mindset of considering Sammi Cannold (’16) a rising star. We might be lulled into thinking this, but she certainly isn’t. Modest, focused, and driven, she proclaims to approach theatre holistically, never centering a show around any given subset of its team (ahem, actors). Even this hour-long conversation revealed that there is a rabidly creative mind working incessantly beneath her calm comportment –an exquisitely self-reflective directorial psyche responsible for some of Stanford’s most memorable musicals. This includes fall quarter’s most talked about show, Violet, which Cannold staged on a moving bus. At the very least, it is safe to say she is one of the loudest voices in a choir of students claiming that theatre is not dead, and that its stories continue to matter.

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a post-modern romantic: an interview with Alex Ketley, Director of ‘Swan Lake: Recalibrated’

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by ANJANA BALA

When I watched Swan Lake: Recalibrated in late February, I was immediately struck by the exploration of the blurred lines between movement and language. “Bodies” didn’t even come to mind as they normally do when I watch dancers move; it seemed as if human ties dissolved entirely into a unique kind of motion. The darkness of Swan Lake was clearly palatable, but this time fragmented through an abstract, modern lens.

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let it ride: an interview with Fitz and the Tantrums’ Joe Karnes

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by JUSTINE BEED

Joe Karnes is one of the founding members of Fitz and the Tantrums and the bassist for the neo-soul pop band. Contributor Justine Beed caught up with him to talk about their new record, More Than Just a Dream, their upcoming tour, and the band’s whirlwind journey.

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A Weird, Contentious Thing: An Interview with Lauren Youngsmith

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Stanford Arts Review sat down with artist Lauren Youngsmith (Class of 2013) to discuss her art, her recent project with the Flaming Lips, and getting Stanford to pick up the tab.

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Tall Guys Can’t Write and Mick LaSalle is 5’7”

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by LAWRENCE NEIL

According to review aggregator RottenTomatoes.com, film critic Mick LaSalle has written 2304 reviews for the San Francisco Chronicle.  He says shenanigans – “I’ve been doing this since 1985.  I have to be way beyond 3000 now.”

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Champagne Bubbles and Polished Chrome

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by LAWRENCE NEIL

Wiley Webb is a freshman progressive house DJ from Malibu who was born with a stage name.  His common app essay began “At my first rave” and his two latest singles, ‘Humour’ and ‘Ambrosia’, dropped in April.

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SAR Interview: Richard Powers

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by KATHARINE SCHWAB

Richard Powers fits right in at Stanford.  One of the first people to have his genome decoded, he has worked as a computer programmer and planned to major in physics while studying at Urbana-Champaign. But most importantly, he’s a prolific novelist and National Book Award winner with his eleventh volume on the way. His work fuses his fascination with science, stemming from what Tobias Wolff called an “extraordinary wide-ranging curiosity,” with the humanity he ultimately finds within his characters and his readers.

On February 13th, Richard Powers read a brand new short story to an intimate crowd at Cemex Auditorium. As the Stein Visiting Writer this quarter, Powers is teaching a creative writing workshop entitled Form and Feeling. He and his students are exploring how to produce the maximal emotional affect on their audience.  The story he read, Saints Hill (he was very clear that there’s no apostrophe), is his own final project and answer to this question.  “The paint is very, very wet,” he laughed to the crowd in Cemex.  He had finished Saints Hill that afternoon, inspired by an unnamed painting by artist Olaf Krans.  The story, half realist and half allegorical, details a couple’s journey to a small prairie town, which is described as “the last breath-catch before facing down the bloody future.”

 

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Stegner Fellow Anthony Marra

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by ARMINE PILIKIAN

Anthony Marra is a novelist in his final year as Stegner Fellow. He was recently awarded the 2012 Whiting Writers’ Award, an award presented to talented emerging writers. His debut novel A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, set to publish this May, dives deep into the lives of two young doctors searching for peace and redemption during wartime in modern-day Chechnya. His short story “Chechnya,” an excerpt from the novel, won a 2010 Pushcart Prize and the 2010 Narrative Prize. We spoke with Marra via Skype.

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NaNoWriMo’s Creator, Chris Baty, Talks Shop

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by T. DOYLE

More than a decade ago, Chris Baty dared to dream that he and his friends could write a novel in one month. Today, he’s inspired thousands to do the same. He kindly sat down with the Stanford Arts Review. 

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Deborah Treisman and The Art of Editing

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by T. DOYLE

You may not know The New Yorker’s fiction editor by name—and she’s fine with that.

The New Yorker has no masthead. Its website contains biographies of 859 contributing writers, but a list of editorial staff is conspicuously absent. The magazine seems to treasure this secrecy, even if others don’t. Deborah Treisman, who has been editing fiction for The New Yorker for fifteen years, admits that the Internet age has made anonymity more difficult: the magazine’s fiction podcast brings her voice to the web once a month, and, according to the soft-spoken editor, has earned her “the one form of celebrity I have.”

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