THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

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Perspectives Art

at once intimate and soaring: A Reading With Visiting Poet Louise Glück

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by KATIE SALMON

Stanford has drawn great writers – they come as speakers, visiting faculty, permanent faculty, and writers in residence.  Given how many speakers the creative writing department hosts each quarter, it seems like it would be difficult to continue to top expectations and make each reading extraordinary.  But this past Tuesday, I was lucky enough to hear poet Louise Glück read to a large, absolutely silent Cemex auditorium.  Expectations were met and exceeded. 

 

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throwback thursday: the ghost of valentine’s past

by MATTHEW LIBBY, HANNA TYSON, and ALEC ARCENEAUX

Oh man. Oh geez. It’s Valentine’s Eve. Either you forgot to get a significant other or you forgot to get something for your significant other. Plus midterms, and that bomb scare. It’s been a rough week. Uncork some wine, buy some overpriced chocolates, and listen/watch/read what a bunch of old dudes have said about love and other Hallmark’s card bullshit.

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Profiles of the Stanford Artist: Jake Friedler (‘15) takes Bashō’s Narrow Road

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by KATHARINE SCHWAB

For those who’ve never written poetry before, the Japanese form of haiku—three line poems with syllables traditionally arranged in a 5-7-5 form—seems like the easiest way to begin. Right? Wrong.

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Profiles of the Stanford Artist: Kunal Sangani (‘16) Talks in Full Paragraphs

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by ERIC EICH

As part of our mission to raise awareness of the arts on Stanford campus, the Stanford Arts Review is starting a weekly feature on the visual artists, writers, musicians, directors, and general fuzzy-types that make Stanford shine.

Kunal Sangani, poet and student, has an asteroid named after him, but it’s not a big deal.

“There’s probably a pretty big contingent of people on campus with asteroids named after them,” he told me when I asked him about the whereabouts of Asteroid Kunal. Clearly trying to hide his alarm at my diligent Googling, he pleaded, “don’t put that in there.”

Sorry, Kunal. Sorry.

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a what the f*** Review of Jack Micheline’s ‘One of a Kind’

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by MAX WALKER-SILVERMAN

This was written while reading a book by a very strange poet who would be considered a beat if he didn’t make such an effort to shun the term. A contemporary of Kerouac, Ginsberg, Corsco et al., he can be thought of as similar to them but dirtier, lower profile, and drunker (admittedly up for debate – the bar was set frighteningly high/low).

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Travels in Chile: Valparaíso y La Casa de Pablo Neruda

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by RANDI ELLEN RUDOLPH

Although I lived and spent the majority of my time in Santiago de Chile, I did travel throughout the country, and one of my favorite trips was to Valparaíso, a port city about an hour west of the capital.  The oldest European city in Chile, Valparaíso is now a World Heritage Site and still holds part of the national government.  It is a small and dirty city built on a steep hill, filled with a colorful mosaic of houses all smashed together.

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