THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

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Perspectives Art

shaping chaos: a review of “Redeployment” by Phil Klay

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by GILLIE COLLINS

Good writing gives shape to chaos. Stories have the power to make paradox survivable, useful, beautiful. There is a particular urgency, then, to literature about war.

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taming the beast: a review of Les Miserables

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by KATIE STRAUB

Les Misérables is the show every now-college-aged musical theater geek saw when they were ten years old, memorized, and has since been singing in the shower. When Ram’s Head asked the Stanford student body if “they hear the people sing” and opened auditions early last quarter, every closeted showgirl and -guy at Stanford felt at least some pull to come out of the woodwork (or that steaming shower stall) for a chance to sing legendary music and play legendary roles.

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opera without apology: Deborah Voigt at Bing

by TOBIN ASHER

Quality and appreciation. Through simple logic, one would expect that the better something is, the more it is valued. But reason alone cannot explain the empty seats at Friday night’s concert.

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an open love letter to Annie Clark

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by SOPHIA LAURENZI

Everyone has a crush on Annie.

Anxiously anticipating the encore of her March 22 concert, the audience rattled the floors of Fox Theater in Oakland with chants of “Annie! Annie! Annie!” A newcomer to her music would never guess that the snowy-haired, electric-guitar-playing space princess known as St. Vincent was the stage name of the reserved, down-to-earth Annie Clark, but this was an audience that called her name like she was a familiar friend.

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Clap Your Hands Say Yeah and the meaning of Unplugged

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by SHIMON TANAKA

A couple of months ago I received a Bandsintown alert about tickets going on sale for a Clap Your Hands Say Yeah concert advertised as a Living Room Show.  Five minutes after the alert, SF and Oakland shows had sold out.  The remaining available show was in Hayward, at an undisclosed location that would be emailed to me if I purchased the tickets.  

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like spiders up and down the frets: Band of Horses at the Palace of Fine Arts

by RACHEL GRAU

"This one’s for all the dead people out there."

That was how I spent my Valentine’s Day: in the dark, rustic, corridors of San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts, listening to Band of Horses’s lead singer Ben Bridwell morbid attempt at a joke before the band launched into their most famous single, “The Funeral.”

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"The Girl You Like": Beyoncé vs. the Male Gaze

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by JAKE FRIEDLER

In a godless world, Beyoncé is the closest thing we have to a goddess. 

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Musical Chairs: Mother Falcon at the Noise Pop Festival

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by HANNA TYSON

Mother Falcon played as part of the 2014 Noise Pop Festival.

Last Thursday, I had the fortune to see all twelve members of the eighteen-piece orchestra from Austin, Texas play on a Persian Rug under the cardboard-colored arch of the Chapel in downtown San Francisco.  Lit in blue and red, they plucked strings, pulled bows, blew horns, whispered words, grinned quietly at the gentle intricacy of their own music, and awoke the audience into a musical reverie. 

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shirtless yurts and holistic hook ups: a review of ‘higher education’, the webseries

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by ALEXANDRA GRAY

Close-up on a girl sobbing about her rejection from the prestigious California University of Palo Alto (CUPA). But Quinn (Jackie Emerson, ’17) doesn’t let a mere letter stop her dreams of academic success and promoting her Tumblr dedicated to cats struggling with foreclosure. She fakes an acceptance and embarks on her adventure as an impostor freshman at CUPA, and we are thus introduced to a slew of students who serve as tour guides at the university.  

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you’re a drinker and i’m childless, or: a review of ‘cat on a hot tin roof’

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by LAWRENCE NEIL

The stage is a runway, a railroad track set about twice as long as it is wide and divided by an off-centered bed with red and brown sheets. The stage is bookended by hints of backdrop, two pop-up walls with mustard yellow base and red floral print: one belonging to Brick, with a television set, record player, and liquor cabinet, the other Maggie’s, with perfumes and two mirrors.  The audiences on either side face each other.

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