THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

Features Opinions
Perspectives Art

black magic, peaches & radioactive cream: first city festival 2014

by BRITTANY NEWELL

photography by ERIC EICH

Music fests are an anthropological field day. Not only do you get to bask in music all day long, but you also get to rub elbows (if you’re lucky) and backsides (if you’re not) with people you would normally do a U-turn to avoid. People of all ages and stripes (though ultimately united by a disposable income) are thrown together in a dusty fairground and made to get along by virtue of the sun, tunes, and smell of fried everything.

Read More

Inside Outside Lands 2014, Part Three: Thank you Ranger Dave

image

by ALEJANDRA SALAZAR

I woke up the morning of Day Three to the collective cries of the online Outside Lands community, case in point being the friend who had woken me up with the tragic news. “Just experienced heartbreak for the first time,” he tweeted. “*sad face emojis*.”

Read More

Inside Outside Lands 2014, Part One: Style and Substances

image

by ALEJANDRA SALAZAR

Nestled in a forest far, far away from civilization (also known as Golden Gate Park), nearly 200,000 people came together to partake in San Francisco’s largest music festival. Outside Lands 2014 was the biggest yet, filled with overpriced ~organic~ gourmet foodstuffs, impeccably dressed twenty-somethings, and sporadic miniature dust storms that left you feeling like you were totally #roughingit amidst all this #nature.

Read More

Break Down of a Bad Seeds Show, or The Search for the Real Nick Cave

image

by MARIE VACHOVSKY

This year is a pivotal one for the classier of the goths, the now grown alt-kids of the 80’s, and the shadowier inhabitants of the Land Down Under, because this is the year of 20,000 Days on Earth, the documentary of the elusive Nick Cave.

Read More

in the blink of an eye: a review of “boyhood”

image

by MATTHEW LIBBY

“Time’s going by,” says one character in the early scenes of Boyhood, the extraordinary latest film from Texan auteur Richard Linklater. It’s a throwaway line, and an obvious one at that, but those three words serve as a simple guideline for the movie as a whole: time’s always going by.

Read More

go away, you sad immoral harlot: Stanford Theater Laboratory presents “Boston Marriage”

image

by ALEC ARCENEAUX

As StAR’s resident David Mamet fanboy, and generally willing to attend plays about lesbians, I was happy for the opportunity to review “Boston Marriage.” This was somewhat tempered by the realization that, unlike Stanford Theater Laboratory’s previous play, the scenery did not contain a chalkboard filled with terrible puns. That was a questionable directorial choice on the part of Austin Caldwell, in my opinion, but I respect that he stuck to his vision.

Read More

Stanford’s annual picnic: a first exposure to Frost Music & Arts Festival

image

by ALEJANDRA SALAZAR and SASHA PERIGO

Two of StAR’s freshmen reporters sit down to talk about Frost. The music festival, not the poet, or the frozen water.

Read More

Kishi Bashi Brings Joy to the World

by SOPHIA LAURENZI

In the scientific community, the theory of chaos as a lens for studying the world says that variability, static, and noise are not exceptions to the steady state—they are the state of the world. In our culture, noise is all that is not music. There is a separation between what is structured and beautiful and downloaded, and what is distracting and plain and blocked out.

But there is joy and beauty in this noise. At his May 17th performance at The Fillmore, Kishi Bashi, the pseudonym of Kaoru Ishibashi, reminded the audience that the boundary between noise and music is not so rigid after all. Though far from noisy, his original music captures something very everyday within its intricacies. In concert, that richness intently came to Lighght—the name of his newest album and current tour, released only four days before the Fillmore performance.

Read More

crossing states and genres with Youngblood Brass Band

image

by SOPHIA LAURENZI

New Orleans
The dark mustiness of this bar wraps around the band so tightly that they appear permanently constrained to maneuvering ten grown men, three different drums, two trombones, three saxophones, two trumpets, and one sousaphone around what can be no larger than a 25 x 15 foot stage. But this is New Orleans, and a traditional brass band draws an already lively city to its feet—this is the music of dancing in the streets, and Youngblood Brass Band’s song choice of “Is That a Riot?” suggests that even they would prefer to take their music and fans outdoors and through the city.

Read More

trouble and redemption: The National at the Greek Theater

by WENDING LU

Sometimes melancholy doesn’t just come from traumatic events, but also from trying to understand the nature of the wounds that linger. The songs in The National’s latest album Trouble Will Find Me conjure many vignettes of people in this state of agony—caught in the middle of a storm and trying to find some meaning in their suffering. How the troubles come about is never made explicit, but we get an impression of how the singer feels when various kinds of trouble with people he cares about seemingly appear out of nowhere.

Read More