THE STANFORD ARTS REVIEW

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Perspectives Art

taming the beast: a review of Les Miserables

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by KATIE STRAUB

Les Misérables is the show every now-college-aged musical theater geek saw when they were ten years old, memorized, and has since been singing in the shower. When Ram’s Head asked the Stanford student body if “they hear the people sing” and opened auditions early last quarter, every closeted showgirl and -guy at Stanford felt at least some pull to come out of the woodwork (or that steaming shower stall) for a chance to sing legendary music and play legendary roles.

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at once intimate and soaring: A Reading With Visiting Poet Louise Glück

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by KATIE SALMON

Stanford has drawn great writers – they come as speakers, visiting faculty, permanent faculty, and writers in residence.  Given how many speakers the creative writing department hosts each quarter, it seems like it would be difficult to continue to top expectations and make each reading extraordinary.  But this past Tuesday, I was lucky enough to hear poet Louise Glück read to a large, absolutely silent Cemex auditorium.  Expectations were met and exceeded. 

 

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hell is other people: stanford theater lab presents “eurydice”

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by ALEC ARCENEAUX

This is a play about Hell. And love. And memory. And language. It is not comfortable. It is frequently uncomfortable. It’s self-conscious, and sometimes subversive, and sometimes absurd. You should go see it.

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a showcase for aesthetic diversity: a review of The Original Winter One Acts

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by BOJAN SRB

Sacrifices to the founder of Pantera, mile-high copulation, quirky office romances, and Mr. Alligator-induced dialogue all abound in Ram’s Head’s Original Winter One Acts, playing January 16-18 at Stanford’s Pigott Theater. To say that OWOA has no underlying theme this year would be a sordid understatement. But don’t worry – as is often the case in the art of combination, a loss in thematic uniformity is a showcase for aesthetic diversity. To my eyes, OWOA shows exactly this: how many directions a Stanford one-act can take.

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Profiles of the Stanford Artist: Another Castle Brings the Funk

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By KATIE SALMON

It is a chilly fall night on campus and people are packed onto rows of couches and benches behind Slav, bundled in coats and scarves and swaying to the music of Another Castle, a three-piece band: a rapping drummer wearing a bright orange headband, a crooning guitarist in a hipster vest, and a bassist whose expression never changes, except for occasionally sticking out his tongue during, presumably, tricky parts.

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Profiles of the Stanford Artist: Charlie and Aidan Geronimus (‘16) Are Spitting That Real-Real

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by ALEC ARCENEAUX

Probably the best thing that music can do is to make everything seem clear and simple, to bring the specific out of the abstract. It distills emotions into action. It can give you a reminder of the idealism that most people grow out of without really knowing why. Hip-hop as a medium is especially conducive to this. It’s a little disappointing to see mainstream musicians unwilling to harness that ability, and it seems like the only ones that do are cloyingly sanctimonious and just not that entertaining to listen to, like Macklemore, or every other Immortal Technique song. (Shots fired.)

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TAKE IT OFF, HARRY ELAM: a review of Gaieties 2013

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by EUGENIA PUGLISI

As I take the seat next to Gaieties producer Nora Tjossem, I know very little about what to expect from this traditionally outrageous, body-painted, Cal-jabbing show, except the blur of riotous laughter that I remember from my freshman year.

High expectations at the beginning, but damn, all of them were met.

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Something to Sway To: Treasure Island 2013

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by ERIC EICH

the second in a three part TI series

Crowds rank at the top of my dislikes, and the great outdoors are not far behind. So the not-too-crowded, non-camping Treasure Island, a sort of zitty but humble stepsister of bigger festivals like Coachella, seemed just fine to me.

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To Imagine Icons: a review of ‘Beautiful: The Carole King Musical’

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by BOJAN SRBINOVSKI

I don’t want to watch these people act. I just want to watch them be.

I remember thinking this as the lights of the Curran Theatre were dimming, and the curtain began to rise. A musical about the life of Carole King is a risky endeavor. Her music does not necessarily translate to the drama to which Broadway stands tantamount. It is also a difficult undertaking because of a lack of source material, and because artistic license is such a deceitful tool when it comes to reimagining the life of a living, breathing icon.

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The Buttery Light, The Darkness Outside: Tuesdays in the Pool Room #2

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by RACHEL MEWES

My first thought upon entering the Kairos poolroom on Tuesday evening was that the atmosphere was perfect. Christmas lights cast the actors’ faces in a warm, yellow glow as they sat in an intimate semicircle of chairs onstage, their soft conversation mingling with the smooth jazz in the background.  Some of them sipped water out of mason jars while highlighting their lines and they smiled at their peers who were filling the room.  I couldn’t help but think that I was about to see something pretty special. 

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